Reshaping Lives: Full Circle FAQ

  • What is it?

    A partnership between Sientra and Mission Plasticos, Reshaping Lives: Full Circle is the first large-scale nationwide program providing no-cost breast reconstructive surgery for post-mastectomy women living in poverty. The program pairs volunteer board-certified plastic surgeons with patients in need across the U.S.

  • How does
    it work?

    By leveraging Sientra’s access to board-certified surgeons throughout the U.S., Sientra will introduce surgeons to the program and seek their volunteer support. Doctors will be asked to commit to 1-4 surgeries a year, volunteering their time and resources, covering additional staff and surgery venue. All surgeries are performed in the U.S., and all FDA device tracking requirements are required.

    Mission Plasticos will identify potential patients in need across America through its referral network of local and national organizations, University Training Programs, county hospitals, and social service agencies, as well as individual patients reaching out through the Reshaping Lives: Full Circle website.

    Once patients are identified at the local level, Mission Plasticos thoroughly vets each and pairs them with a Reshaping Lives: Full Circle volunteer board-certified plastic surgeon in their area to coordinate their full journey of care.

  • Who is eligible
    to participate?

    Patients in the U.S. living below the poverty line in need of post-mastectomy breast reconstructive surgery that are uninsured, underinsured, or ineligible for continued care through public programs.

    Active board-certified plastic surgeons who complete the application process and are willing to volunteer their time, talents, and resources to the program.

  • What products
    will be used?

    For each Reshaping Lives: Full Circle surgery, Sientra will supply to the surgeons at no cost; Sientra state-of-the-art silicone gel breast implants, which have an unrivaled safety profile and are clinically shown to have low complication rates1; and their one-of-a-kind breast tissue expanders, which are used to form a new breast pocket that will eventually hold the long-term breast implant. For more information about Sientra and the Sientra portfolio of breast products visit sientra.com/breast-reconstruction/.

  • How much
    will it cost?

    Through the efforts of the Reshaping Lives: Full Circle program and the generosity of our volunteer board-certified plastic surgeons, eligible U.S. patients will not be charged for the surgery. This will allow women who may not normally have access to these services the ability to receive the care they need.

  • What are the risks
    and responsibilities?

    To learn about the benefits and risks associated with breast implants and expanders, please visit sientra.com/commitment-to-safety/. For program liability and responsibility information, please contact info@missionplasticos.org.

  • Why was this
    program started?

    Sixty percent of U.S. women with breast cancer who live below the poverty line are inadequately insured and may not have access to breast reconstructive surgery,2 despite reconstruction being considered the standard of care in breast cancer recovery.3 Mission Plasticos and Sientra believe that every woman deserves a full journey of care, regardless of her economic situation.

Additional Information

  • Issues Surrounding Access to Breast Reconstruction

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  • Mission Plasticos Backgrounder

    TO DOWNLOAD PDF, PLEASE CLICK HERE>>

Media Inquiries

News & Press Releases

1. Stevens WG, Calobrace MB, Alizadeh A, Zeidler KR, Harrington JL, d’Incelli RC. Ten-year core study data for Sientra’s Food and Drug Administration—approved round and shaped breast implants with cohesive silicone gel. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2018;141(4S):7S-19S
2. i Gorey, K. M., Richter, N. L., Luginaah, I. N., Hamm, C., Holowaty, E. J., Zou, G., & Balagurusamy, M. K. (2015). Breast cancer among women living in poverty: Better care in Canada than in the United States. Social Work Research, 39(2), 107–118. https://doi.org/10.1093/swr/svv006